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Anonymous asked:
Okay. So my friend and I are in the event Road Scholar and out state competition is literally Friday, and my friends mom just texted me that she can't go and I'm like freaking out. I have no idea how to do road scholar because I just go moved into the event last Friday. So do you know anything about road scholar?

omg I’m so sorry :(

that’s absolutely awful… and unfortunately I don’t know much about road scholar but do any followers?

Best of luck Friday! The good thing is, a LOT of teams have these sorts of mishaps, and others don’t even start studying until the bus ride to the states venue so you’re fate isn’t totally irrevocable. Just study REALLY hard the next few hours and if anyone comes up with any suggestions/tips/sources I will post them asap!

UPDATE ME GUYS

TELL ME HOW THE POST-SEASON/NATIONALS LIFE IS FOR ALL Y’ALL

Does your team have a chance of making it to nationals? [Best of luck to you]

We actually just had our states competition last week haha
Unfortunately we didn’t qualify for natties this year but we’re hopeful for next year!

Anonymous asked:
sounds of music is literally the most stressful thing ever bc all your competitors are watching you and judging your range and pitch even if its all fine... helicopters is just tragic because seeing it flutter to the ground, even after a long duration flight, is like seeing your child slowly die.

relatable because elastic launched glider omg

positive-emoceans:

T-shirt design
"You’re basic"

positive-emoceans:

T-shirt design

"You’re basic"

It’s always the wedding with the cheeseburgers and potato salad
We might as well change the event name from Disease Detectives to Food-Borne Illnesses

It’s always the wedding with the cheeseburgers and potato salad

We might as well change the event name from Disease Detectives to Food-Borne Illnesses

Anonymous asked:
I've got my first competition tomorrow, and I'm participating in four events... Any advice??

YES OMG

If any are studying events, make sure to ANSWER AS MANY QUESTIONS AS POSSIBLE even if it means being the last team to leave the testing room. So long as you don’t go too far overtime that you get penalized, stay for as long as possible and show as much work as possible even if you’re not sure you’re doing the questions right. Attempting and guessing just a few more questions than your fellow competitors can be the difference between 1st and 10th place - no joke. It comes in handy especially when event coordinators need to set tie breakers if more than one team have the same raw test scores in a single event.

Also, if the test comes in a paper packet, make sure to split the test up in order to get as much of the test done as possible. Of course I know this kind of method doesn’t always work perfectly because in something like Disease Detectives you have several long stories/case scenarios that occupy 2-3 pages of the test including corresponding questions, but still try to divi-up the test as best as possible. Most event coordinators make their tests too long for the actual time allotted for the event, so splitting up the test will really help in terms of time management, and when each partner is done with his/her section of the test they can switch and check over each section. Also, if you can’t see a clock from where you’re seated (happened to me this year) don’t be afraid to ask for the time during the middle of the test. Time management is KEY in scioly events.

Also make sure to bring everything you need for your event like writing utensils, calculators, and cheat sheets! Believe it or not, but some teams don’t even prepare cheat sheets or bring calculators. Big mistake! Also try to make your double-sided cheat sheet ONE double-sided sheet of paper, not two single-sided sheets stapled or taped back-to-back. I’ve heard of several occasions where event coordinators forbid students from using single-sided sheets taped back-to-back even though they were securely taped. Stupid, I know, but you’d rather be safe than sorry. Also, even if you’re a prefer using pens, bring a few pencils because some tests use scantrons (like Ento this year at Div. C Western Nassau).

If you’re in one of those field guide events (i.e. Rocks & Minerals or Entomology) and your event is a station-by-station sort of event, DO EVERY STATION AS QUICK AS POSSIBLE. I don’t know if this applies to other states, but I know in my region and state competition the field guide events are always 1-2 minute identification/question stations. One to two minutes is really not a lot of time to identify AND answer questions, so what my partner and I do is we have one person identify and the other person looks up the specimen in our field guide/notes to answer the accompanying questions. As far as I know that’s the most efficient way of approaching those types of tests.

And, if it’s a building event, make sure to bring spare parts/glue/tools/anything you need in an emergency tool-kit. I know for Elastic Launched Glider you’re allowed to make modifications on the spot if your plane breaks mid-flight or something, so it’s definitely a good idea to bring extra supplies in case anything happens [knocks on wood]

Bring water and snacks, a laptop (if you want to do some extra last-minute studying/refreshing), and all necessary study materials. 

Also, when it comes time for your event, DON’T SHOW UP TOO EARLY!! Of course don’t show up too late either; I’m just saying that showing up too early will just make you more anxious and nervous than you need to be. Being 5 minutes early to your event is plenty early so don’t get all paranoid by thinking you need to be at your event like 15 minutes before hand. That’s crazy.

Most importantly, HAVE FUN. RELAX. Remember, Science Olympiad is just an extracurricular for people who enjoy science and being on a scholastic team. Winning is nice, don’t get me wrong, but it’s not the only thing to Scioly that matters. Go see some building events in your downtime, eat lunch with your friends, mingle with other schools, and just enjoy the experience.

If any of your followers are from a Bay Area Science Olympiad Division C team, I want to congratulate them on an amazing job well done--to the teams that qualified for State and for those who didn't. I would love to get in touch with them to congratulate them personally, but for now I just want to convey that over the past four years I've seen such improvement in the region, and I've seen everyone setting the bar higher and higher for each other and other teams. It's been an honor to compete.